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Telenet Scanning by Doc Telecom (July 11, 1988)

**********************************************************************
* *
* TELENET SCANNING *
* *
* written by Doc Telecom on July 11, 1988 *
* *
**********************************************************************

Telenet is the largest Packet Switching network, that I know of at this
present time, I could waste valuable buffer space explaining what packet
switching is and what its uses are ect…so for more information read
“Packet Switching (tomorrow’s communications today) by Roy D. Rosner. It
is quite indepth and one of the books I cherish in my “legal” Telecomm
library.

DEFINITION of GTE TELENET : The packet switching subsidiary of General
Telephone and Electronics. It provides nationwide common user data
communications via packet switching

Information on GTE TELENET :
—————————-

The GTE Telenet commercial packet switched network was developed as a
commercial venture of many of the same principals who developed ARPANET.
GTE Telenet first became in 1979.

OPERATION :
————

Telenets network operation and internal protocals evolved from the ARPANET
experience , with additional cababilitys built into each of the switching
nodes. The network is mostly a ciruit bases packet switching protocol, that
does meet the requirments of the CCITT X.25 protocol at the user interface.
In addition, Telenet also provides customized user interfaces to meet the
need of the individual users. It also provides emulation interfaces.

USER ACCESS :
————-

User access to the network is through one of the three clases of telenet
central offices, such as the one in San Fran, support user access speeds up
to 56k bps is a Class I. Class II offices, such as the one in Spokane,Wa
provide connection speeds up to 9600 bps. Class III offices support rates
up to 1200 bps, such as the one in tucson,arizona. User access can be made
to Public Dialin ports, private dial in ports, or fixed ports dedicated full
time for a single user. Users can implement X.25 compatable software in
there host computer or they can just use the T-net provided interface
processors to provide network service. Terminal Clusters can be accessed to
the network very effciently by use of Telenet access controllers placed at
the customers residence or business,ect..

Telenet Dialups
—————

To find the local Telenet dialup for your area just call WATS to 800-TEL-ENET
and ask them for it but remember to watch out “Every thing you do on telenet
is saved on Mega tape for up to 5 years, and they have installed number
identification since December 1987,

WATS TELENET DIALUPS….

(800) 424-9494 300/1200 BPS
(800) 238-0631 2400 & MPE

These wats will change in aug. 88 so if you would like the new ones leave my
E-Mail on Lunitics Labs (415) 278-7421

What to do one you have your POTS dialup:
—————————————–

Remember to do any scanning on telenet you need a POTS dialup not a WATS,
the WATS dialup is mainly used for Telemail or GTE MAIL., or SPRINT HP’s
Call your local dial up and you should see something that says TELENET
617 18m, or whatevr…just hit a few times. and you should see
something that looks like this.

@

at the “@” prompt type in NPA XXX..for now just use your area code…

like this….( this is a Network User Address or NUA)

@ 415 333

it will then either connect you, or say “Collect Connection Refused”,
because you have not used an NUI, more on NUI’s later…

you will see one of the following :

1) call connected …. 2) Remote Procedure Error 11 b6
3) Remote Procedure Error 11 e2
4) Not Reachable 05 e6
5) not reachable 05 db
6) Not operating …. 7) illegal address 03 80
8) Busy 01 00 ….. 9) enhanced network services unavalible at this time please try again 05 d8
10) illegal address 03 ba
11) rejecting 00 7e
12) illegal address 03 42
13) remote procedure error 11 31
14) Refused collect connection 19 00 …..
15) not reachable 05 ed
16) not responding 0d f0

if the call is connected you will find an interesting computer system, or
whatever..

What is an NUI and how do you use it..
—————————————

An NUI or Network User Id is mostly used for connecting to things that give
you the “Refused collect connection” error. I always have an NUI in use when
I am scanning

at the @ promt type:

@ ID USERID

it will come up with a
PASS= promt, so then you enter the password I have a listing of about 80
or so NUI’s and they usually dont die , so here is a few….

ID SIMPCNOE
PASS= 071034

ID FINLAY
PASS= 004461

NUA listing of recent things Scanned by DOC telecom:
—————————————————-

NUA SYSTEM TYPE SPECIAL NOTES
————— ———————– ———————————-
804 35 ?
804 43 PRIME PRIMENET
303 38 PRIME PRIMENET 21.0.3.C1 SL
804 60 ?
713 436 CONNECTS
713 450 CONNECTS
713 454 CONNECTS
713 462 CONNECTS
713 431 CONNECTS
612 442 ?
415 333 AOS/VS 7.56
415 334 AOS/VS 7.56
206 20 HP 3000
206 30 HP 3000
206 32 VAX MICRO VMS V4.7
206 35 CONCURRECT COMPUTER CORP
206 38 AOS/VS 7.56
206 42 AOS/VS 7.56
206 44 AOS/VS 7.56
206 40 PRIME PRIMENET 20.2.4
206 53 CONNECTS
206 65 PRIME PRIMENET 20.1.1D OAD
206 72 DIFFRENT KINDS UNIV. OF WASHINGTON
212 137 PRIME PRIMENET 21.0.3.R7.PTC.3 NY60
909 46
303 65 COMPUTER SHARING SYSTEM
212 32 CIDIADVICE CENTER
303 23 PRIME
212 112 VM/370 ONLINE
212 131 VM/370 ONLINE
909 400
909 401
909 403
909 404
909 406
909 407
909 409
909 502
909 508 PRIME
909 600
909 615 PRIME
909 617 PRIME
212 20 “ENTER ID”
212 21 “ENTER ID”
909 810
909 800
909 801
909 802
909 805
909 811
909 815
909 818
909 819
415 37 HP 3000
617 622 UNIX MEDIA LABS…
214 71 PRIME PRIMENET FB.3.3 UUCB
212 146 OFFICE INFO SERVICE
415 20 DIALOG
213 35 MARKETRUN RESERCH AND SALES
909 95 PRIME TELENET NEWS SEWRVICE
305 22 HP 3000 CIERRA COMPUTER
201 25 DEC NJIT ELECTRONIC INFO EXCHANGE
515 30 LEXIS/NEXIS
201 67 WARNER BROTHERS SYSTEMS
201 68 WARNER BROTHERS SYSTEMS
212 28 OUTDIAL
909 12 PRIME
909 13 CONNECTS
909 51 CONNECTS
909 52 CONNECTS
909 54 CONNECTS
909 58 CONNECTS
909 26 PRIME
909 38
909 39 PRIME
909 49
909 55
909 777 CONNECTS
909 65
909 63
909 53
909 56
909 60
909 62

I hope this file is provided to be useful, until next time call with care.

Doc Telecom

Cracking Auto Bank Teller Machines by the Suspect

CRACKINGAUTOBANKTELLER MACHINES

Downloaded by the Suspect

Most auto teller machines require an
ID card to retrieve money. The circuit
ry inside the machines has been made mo
re sophisticated year after year. After
the 3 highschool kids got $92,000 from
a machine in California in 1983, the F
BI investigated and found out how they
used cracked account numbers to gain a
ccess, the California Trade Commision i
mposed stricter regulations regarding t
he protection of bank teller machines.
The all-plastic ID cards which could be
easily forged with the right account n
umber and codes were replaced with undu
plicatable ones which had a special mat
erial only sensitive sensors in the mac
hines could detect. When faulty cards
were inserted in the machines, alarms w
ent off and guards were summoned. Lots
of good hackers were taken out of busin
ess this way. Now, not only is therea
special coating on the IDcards, but t
he codes also indicate social security
# and name, age and address of the owne
r. The computers were impenetrable, be
cause those carrying ID numbers and inf
o were unreachable by conventional phon
e lines. Codes were shipped via armor
ed car.
The phone line #’s used by the ID re
cords computers are all on the military
exchange, and an automatic tracer is a
lways included. My friend tried hackin
g this one with a sandbox attached, and
although he wasn’t traced, the securit
y traced his hacked ID number. He told
me in a note he slipped me in the juvey
he’s been put in. The security caught
him when they checked his ID number ag
ainst the backup copy at the supposed b
ank. If this isn’t hard enough, the ba
nk’s files are also checked against har
d copy backup files, unaccessable to yo
u know who (us!).
If anyone has any info that can he
lp us with this dilemma, please call!
>?
>EXIT
>MENU

9: Text Philez P-Z
+-+UD:Punter
[-]30 Minutes
+-+UnltdBlk:

Information on Telenet Scanning

TELENET SCANNING

Telenet is the largest Packet Switching network, that I know of at this
present time, I could waste valuable buffer space explaining what packet
switching is and what its uses are ect…so for more information read
“Packet Switching (tomorrow’s communications today) by Roy D. Rosner. It
is quite indepth and one of the books I cherish in my “legal” Telecomm
library.

DEFINITION of GTE TELENET : The packet switching subsidiary of General
Telephone and Electronics. It provides nationwide common user data
communications via packet switching

Information on GTE TELENET :
—————————-

The GTE Telenet commercial packet switched network was developed as a
commercial venture of many of the same principals who developed ARPANET.
GTE Telenet first became in 1979.

OPERATION :
————

Telenets network operation and internal protocals evolved from the ARPANET
experience , with additional cababilitys built into each of the switching nods.
The network is mostly a ciruit bases packet switching protocol, that does meet
the requirments of the CCITT X.25 protocol at the user interface. In addition,
Telenet also provides customized user interfaces to meet the need of the
individual users. It also provides emulation interfaces.

USER ACCESS :
————-

User access to the network is through one of the three clases of telenet
central offices, such as the one in San Fran, support user access speeds up to
56k bps is a Class I. Class II offices, such as the one in Spokane,Wa provide
connection speeds up to 9600 bps. Class III offices support rates up to 1200
bps, such as the one in tucson,arizona. User access can be made to Public
Dialin ports, private dial in ports, or fixed ports dedicated full time for a
single user. Users can implement X.25 compatable software in there host
computer or they can just use the T-net provided interface processors to
provide network service. Terminal Clusters can be accessed to the network very
effciently by use of Telenet access controllers placed at the customers
residece or business,ect..

Telenet Dialups
—————

To find the local Telenet dialup for your area just call WATS to 800-TEL-ENET
and ask them for it but remember to watch out “Every thing you do on telenet is
saved on Mega tape for up to 5 years, and they have installed number
identification since December 1987,

WATS TELENET DIALUPS….

(800) 424-9494 300/1200 BPS
(800) 238-0631 2400 & MPE

These wats will change in aug. 88 so if you would like the new ones leave my
E-Mail on Lunitics Labs (415) 278-7421

What to do one you have your POTS dialup:
—————————————–

Remember to do any scanning on telenet you need a POTS dialup not a WATS, the
WATS dialup is mainly used for Telemail or GTE MAIL., or SPRINT HP’s Call your
local dial up and you should see something that says TELENET 617 18m, or
whatevr…just hit a few times. and you should see something that looks
like this.

@

at the “@” prompt type in NPA XXX..for now just use your area code…

like this….( this is a Network User Address or NUA)

@ 415 333

it will then either connect you, or say “Collect Connection Refused”,
because you have not used an NUI, more on NUI’s later…

you will see one of the following :

1) call connected …. 2) Remote Procedure Error 11 b6
3) Remote Procedure Error 11 e2
4) Not Reachable 05 e6
5) not reachable 05 db
6) Not operating …. 7) illegal address 03 80
8) Busy 01 00 ….. 9) enhanced network services unavalible at this time please try again 05 d8
10) illegal address 03 ba
11) rejecting 00 7e
12) illegal address 03 42
13) remote procedure error 11 31
14) Refused collect connection 19 00 …..
15) not reachable 05 ed
16) not responding 0d f0

if the call is connected you will find an interesting computer system, or
whatever..

What is an NUI and how do you use it..
—————————————

An NUI or Network User Id is mostly used for connecting to things that give
you the “Refused collect connection” error. I always have an NUI in use when I
am scanning

at the @ promt type:

@ ID USERID

it will come up with a
PASS= promt, so then you enter the password I have a listing of about 80 or
so NUI’s and they usually dont die , so here is a few….

ID SIMPCNOE
PASS= 071034

ID FINLAY
PASS= 004461

NUA listing of recent things Scanned by DOC telecom:
—————————————————-

NUA SYSTEM TYPE SPECIAL NOTES
————— ———————– ———————————-
804 35 ?
804 43 PRIME PRIMENET
303 38 PRIME PRIMENET 21.0.3.C1 SL
804 60 ?
713 436 CONNECTS
713 450 CONNECTS
713 454 CONNECTS
713 462 CONNECTS
713 431 CONNECTS
612 442 ?
415 333 AOS/VS 7.56
415 334 AOS/VS 7.56
206 20 HP 3000
206 30 HP 3000
206 32 VAX MICRO VMS V4.7
206 35 CONCURRECT COMPUTER CORP
206 38 AOS/VS 7.56
206 42 AOS/VS 7.56
206 44 AOS/VS 7.56
206 40 PRIME PRIMENET 20.2.4
206 53 CONNECTS
206 65 PRIME PRIMENET 20.1.1D OAD
206 72 DIFFRENT KINDS UNIV. OF WASHINGTON
212 137 PRIME PRIMENET 21.0.3.R7.PTC.3 NY60
909 46
303 65 COMPUTER SHARING SYSTEM
212 32 CIDIADVICE CENTER
303 23 PRIME
212 112 VM/370 ONLINE
212 131 VM/370 ONLINE
909 400
909 401
909 403
909 404
909 406
909 407
909 409
909 502
909 508 PRIME
909 600
909 615 PRIME
909 617 PRIME
212 20 “ENTER ID”
212 21 “ENTER ID”
909 810
909 800
909 801
909 802
909 805
909 811
909 815
909 818
909 819
415 37 HP 3000
617 622 UNIX MEDIA LABS…
214 71 PRIME PRIMENET FB.3.3 UUCB
212 146 OFFICE INFO SERVICE
415 20 DIALOG
213 35 MARKETRUN RESERCH AND SALES
909 95 PRIME TELENET NEWS SEWRVICE
305 22 HP 3000 CIERRA COMPUTER
201 25 DEC NJIT ELECTRONIC INFO EXCHANGE
515 30 LEXIS/NEXIS
201 67 WARNER BROTHERS SYSTEMS
201 68 WARNER BROTHERS SYSTEMS
212 28 OUTDIAL
909 12 PRIME
909 13 CONNECTS
909 51 CONNECTS
909 52 CONNECTS
909 54 CONNECTS
909 58 CONNECTS
909 26 PRIME
909 38
909 39 PRIME
909 49
909 55
909 777 CONNECTS
909 65
909 63
909 53
909 56
909 60
909 62

Downloaded From P-80 Systems 304-744-2253

Telecom Computer Security Bulletin: Expansion of the Z80 Chip, by King Lucifer (Alias Byteman) on September 10, 1988

_______________________________________________________________________________

Expansion of the Z80 CPU Chip
Written by King Lucifer (Alias Byteman) on 9/10/88

A Telecom Computer Security Bulletin File
Volume One, Number 1, File 12 of 12
_______________________________________________________________________________

The circut described here expands the z80 uP’s 64k byte memory space to
512k bytes by switching among sixteen 32k byte banks. The approach allows
you to programs larger than 64k bytes for applications that can tolerate
an I/O operation each time the program crosses one of the 32k byte –
boundaries.

The Z80’s lower address lines (Schematic) provide access to the 32k-byte
common bank of memory. The sixteenth line (A15 through A18) by activating
four additional bits (A15 through A18) Consequently, the system can access
2;19 or 512k, unique memory locations.

Schematic
———
_____________________________________________> (Ao – A14)
________ / \ __________
| z80 ao|_/ \|a ic 0|o________
| ic1 a1|_| |_|b 74ls1381|o–o |
| |_| |_|c 2|o–o |
| .|_| | | 3|o–o |
| .|_| _____|en 4|o–o |
| .|_| | ___|en 5|o–o |
| |_| | | _|en 6:o–o |
| |_| | | | | 7:o–o |___ ______ _______
| |_| | | – | | | | | |
| |_| | | |__________| ____|d Q|____| – |
| |_| | | |____|d Q|____| | |
| |___________|_|_____ |____|d Q|____| | A |
| |___ | | | | | 74ls | | – |
| |___| | | | | ~~~~|~~~ | -|a1
| |___| | | | | O | | |a2
| |___| | | | | | | | |a3
| |___| | | | | | | | |a4
| Z80 |___| | | | | | | -|
| |___| | | | | | | – |
| |___| | | | | | __| | |
| | | | | | | | |__| |B |
|________| | | | | | | |__| | |
O O | | | | | | |__| – |
| |______________| | | | | | |_______|
|_____________________| | | | | O |
|| | | | | |____| |
|| |_______________|_________________/_________|____________|_do-7
|| o(5v) |______________— _________|____________|
|| |_____— ___________________/—
||_________________/—
o________________________________________________________|
ln

_______________________________________________________________________________
$ 

Telecom Computer Security Bulletin: DEC Terminal Server Basics by Mad Hacker (September 10, 1988)

_______________________________________________________________________________

DEC Terminal Server Basics
Written by Mad Hacker {the original} on 09/10/88

A Telecom Computer Security Bulletin File
Volume One, Number 1, File 11 of 12
_______________________________________________________________________________

This is the A B C’s of using a DEC terminal server. A DEC terminal server can
be quite a handy thing if you know a few of it’s basic commands. Ok enough
said, time to log in….

LOGGING INTO THE DECSERVER:

To login to the DECserver you may be required to enter a login password. But
to tell the truth, most DECservers are not password protected. It seems that
most people don’t think of a DECserver as a possible weak link in their
security. I guess they feel that the server is not a computer and so it is not
a thing that needs to be protected. This is a very serious mistake! Many
computer systems have been compromised by the lax security of the external
devices hooked to them, in this case, the DECserver.

If you need to log in, this is how to do it.

1. Press twice; a number sign (#) appears along with an audible beep.

2. Enter the login password. For example, to log in with the password HACKER

enter twice

# HACKER type the password (which is not echoed)

3. If you make a mistake, the prompt reappears (and the “beep”) to let you
try again. You have several chances to enter the correct password.

4. If you use a dial-in modem, you have 60 seconds to respond to the #
prompt with the correct password. If you don’t, the server disconnects
your modem.

If you do not need to enter a login password, {that is how most are setup},
just press twice and you are in.

When you log in, an introductory line of text appears…

DECserver 200 Terminal Server V1.0 – LAT V5.1

If your port does not have a permanent username defined, enter your name (1 to
16 keyboard characters) after the following text appears…

Please type HELP if you need assistance

Enter username> MAD_HACKER

The Local> prompt appears after you type your username.

If your port does have a permanent username, here’s what you see…

Please type HELP if you need assistance

Local>

USING ONLINE HELP:

Online help is documentation about DECserver commands that is stored in server
memory. You can see this documentation interactively on your terminal while
you are using the DECserver. The HELP command gives you access to online help.
You can use it in one of two ways:

You can type HELP at the Local> prompt…

Local> HELP

This generates a succession of HELP “frames”, “menus”, and prompts. Frames
are made up of the information that can fit on one or more terminal screens.
Menus are lists of topics you can choose from.

Alternatively, you can specify topics and subtopics when you enter the HELP
command. For example…

Local> HELP SET PORT

This command produces online documentation that describes the SET PORT command.

SOME DEFINITIONS:

The primary function of the DECserver is to allow you to connect to “services”
offered on your network. A service can be a computer system that you can use
just as though your terminal were attached directly to the system, or it can
be a function offered by such a system. In addition, services can be set-up
to allow access to printers, out-dial modems, personal computers and terminal
switches. To connect to a service, you only need to know the service name.
_______________________________________________________________________________

A NOTE ABOUT OUT-DIALS CONNECTED TO A DECserver:

When an outdial modem is put on the DECserver and some local hacks find
it, well you get the picture…..the company that own’s it will often get
a 100-500 page bill from the phone company. After that happens, the company
that is the proud owner of a $5000.00 phone bill will often decide to
password protect the DECserver. On the other hand, the out-dial may be run
off a flat rate SPRINT or WATS line. If that is the case the out-dial will
live a long and non-password protected life… 🙂
_______________________________________________________________________________

DEFINITIONS CONTINUED:

A “service node” is a computer system or server that offers services.

A “session” is a connection to a service. You can have one or more simul-
taneous sessions with one service, or more than one service. The connection
you are using at any one time is called your “current session”. Your other
sessions are inactive, but can be resumed by using server commands or session
switches.

“Service mode” is your environment when you interact with a service. For
example, if the service is a computer system, your environment is the same as a
terminal directly wired to the system. You can all use the system’s commands
and resources.

“Local mode” is your environment when you interact with the DECserver
using commands entered at the Local> prompt.

CONNECTING TO A SERVICE:

Use the local mode SHOW SERVICES command to display a list of services you can
use.

Local> SHOW SERVICES

To connect to a service (establish a session with the service) enter the
DECserver CONNECT command with the name of the service you want. For example,
for a service called MEGA-SYSTEM, enter the following command:

Local> CONNECT MEGA-SYSTEM

This command places you in service mode in an active session with the service
MEGA-SYSTEM. In this case, MEGA-SYSTEM is a CRAY with 200 GIG on-line.

RETURNING TO LOCAL MODE FROM A SERVICE SESSION:

To return to local mode without ending your session, press or press
your local switch character. Both these characters are, in effect, DECserver
commands that instruct the server to go back to local mode.

The character must be set up to permit this (by default it is), and
the local switch character must be defined (by default it is not).

Use the HELP command for more details on setting up the character and
local switch character.

*** NOTE ***

Some modems interprets the character as a command to end
your dial-in connection. If you are using one of these modems,
do not use to return to local mode.

Your session, now inactive, is still your current session because it is the
session your were using most recently.

RESUMING YOUR SERVICE SESSION FROM LOCAL MODE:

To resume your current session (and service mode) while your are in local
mode, enter the DECserver RESUME command.

Local> RESUME

You go back to where you left off when before returning to local mode.

DISCONNECTING FROM A SERVICE:

To end your current session while in service mode, use the command that
terminates whatever process you are using. For example, you can terminate a
session on a VAX/VMS system by typing the VMS LOGOUT command. Refer to the
documentation for the service node that offers the service.

To end your current session while in local mode, enter the DECserver DISCONNECT
command.

Local> DISCONNECT

You cannot resume a service session after you end the connection with
DISCONNECT.

CONNECTING TO A SECOND SERVICE:

The DECserver allows you to have several sessions at one time, to the same or
to different services. To connect to a second (or subsequent) service, simply
enter another CONNECT command from local mode, specifying the name of the
service. For example, to connect to the service OUT-DIAL, enter the following
command:

Local> CONNECT OUT-DIAL

To resume one of your non-current sessions, use the FORWARDS command to switch
to your next session, or the BACKWARDS command to switch to your previous
session. Alternatively, you can use the RESUME command and specify the session
number. You can find this number from the SHOW SESSIONS display:

Local> RESUME SESSION 2

To disconnect a particular session, use the DISCONNECT command and specify the
session number. For example:

Local> DISCONNECT SESSION 1

LOGGING OUT OF THE DECSERVER:

To logout from the DECserver, enter the DECserver LOGOUT command (in local
mode).

Local> LOGOUT

LOGOUT disconnects all sessions. A DECserver message appears verifying the
logout.

Well that is about it for now. There are a number of other nice commands but
you should be able to find your way around now. Happy Hack’n….

_______________________________________________________________________________
$ 

Telecom Computer Security Bulletin: Your Personal Phone Security, by King Lucifer (August 10, 1988)

_______________________________________________________________________________

Your Personal Phone Security
Written By King Lucifer (Alias Byteman) on 8/10/88

A Telecom Computer Security Bulletin File
_______________________________________________________________________________

To secure speech transmissions against evaesdroppers, you could scramble the
speech information by rearranging its frequency spectrum. This Technique has
particular application for radio-link transmissions for example, in land
mobile radios, cellular radios, or cordless phones-in which it’s relatively
easy for third parties to tune in to the transmission frequency.

To My knowledge, the FX204 variable-split-band Frequency-inverter IC
performs scrambling or descrambling of speech on one chip. The IC splits
voiceband information into High and Low Frequency Bands and then inverts
each band around its center frequency. The FX204’s switched capacitor
filters split the frequency spectrum, and its balanced modulators perform
the frequency inversion of each band. All Clocking information for the filters
and modulators comes from a single external 1-MHz crystal that you can connect
directly across two of the IC’s pins.

Five CMOS-Compatible latched programming inputs allow you to program the
device’s internal clock dividers to produce one of 32 diffrent voiceband-
frequency split points between 350Hz and 2800Hz. You can hard-wire these
inputs to produce a fixed-code scrambler, or you can Dynamically change them
during the transmission to produce a rolling-code scrambler.

The IC’s Transmit/Recive control input optimizes the internal operation
of the FX204 for scrambling or descrambling. To recombine the upper and lower
frequency bands and provide a low-impedance audio output, the IC has on-chip
summing amplifier with external gain defining resistors.

The FX204 requires a transmission-channel bandwidth of 300 to 3400 Hz;
However it reduces the Upper bandwidth limit of the transmitted speech
frequency to 2700 Hz. The Redirection in effective speech-frequency bandwidth
occurs because the fx204 separates the high and low frquency band by 700Hz in
order to reduce spurious outputs.

You can opeate the device over narrower transmission-channel bandwidths
for example, the 3-kHz bandwidth used for mobile radio by reducing your
external crystal oscillator’s clock frequency. The Audio Input is capable
of handling a maximum input signal of at least 340 m V rms; the Dynamic
range is 25 dB typ.

Fabricated in CMOS technology, the FX204 operates from a single 5v supply.
It draws 3 mA typ (10 mA max) of supply current so it’s suitable for use
in battery-powered equipment. Supplied in a 24-pin ceramic DIP or Surface-
Mount Flat pack…

Schematics
———-
VDD__.__. _. \._ _. \._ __.__
| |… |__ | |__ | ___((_|
| (((( \\\ | \\\ | _!_((. |
| |||| Clear | Rx/Tx|________|___|_|.___
__________|__….________|_______|________|___|_|____|
| |__|——-| | | | | | |
_____|______ |__|–Rom–| | |________|___|_|____|
| | | -)] |
| | * \/ | |
|____|_______|____{ – } | | (Audio Out)
| | | | | | |____/-\_/\_
|_________________[ + ]______|_________[ + ]_________._____|____( )__ |
| | ______________|____.___.| |
| | 0 0 [_(>———–|—-||–\/—+
|____|___|(300 2700 Audio Input) ______________|_____|___|___|
|____|_____________[ + ]_____ ______ _[ + ]____________________|__( )–+
|| || |
——— || || |
| FX204 | || || |
——— (Pin 1) (Pin 2)__\/______\/__________________________|

_______________________________________________________________________________
$