Tymnet File #3 by The Twilight Phone

Tymnet File #3
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

********** Courtesy of the -:Twilight Phone:- **********

COMMUNICATION PRODUCTS VERIFIED BY TYMNET

TYMNET is the “PC Friendly Network.” To make it easier for you
to use personal computers, terminals and other products over our network
we have been busy verifying communication products. This is to ensure
that they work adequately, particularly those that can be used to access
3270 applications through our Async to 3270 service. A list of products
verified, and details about individual products are available below.
To return to the main menu, type the word ‘UP’. To exit, type ‘EXIT’.

1. PC PRODUCTS: LIST OF VERIFIED PC SOFTWARE PRODUCTS
2. PC PRODUCTS: DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT VERIFIED PRODUCTS FOR
A SPECIFIC COMPANY.
3. PC PRODUCTS: SEARCH FOR VERIFIED PC PRODUCTS BY KEY WORDS
4. TERMINALS: LIST OF TERMINALS VERIFIED FOR TYMNET’S ASYNC TO 3270
SERVICE
5. OTHER COMMUNICATIONS PRODUCTS: DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT OTHER
VERIFIED COMMUNICATIONS PRODUCTS

TYPE THE NUMBER OF THE DESIRED MENU ITEM FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:1

ASYNC TO 3270 SERVICE
PERSONAL COMPUTERS AND VERIFIED SOFTWARE

CHARACTER MODE INTERFACE

Personal Computer Software Company
—————– ——– ——-
Apple II Softerm Softronics
Softerm 2 Softronics
Apple IIe Softerm Softronics
Apple Lisa LISA terminal Apple
Apple Macintosh Macterm Apple
Burroughs Work Station B21 Chameleon Iconics
DEC Rainbow Rainbow 100 DEC
poly-TRM Polygon Assoc
Fortune VT/E0003-01 P2/i
HP 150 Crosstalk Microstuf
IBM Displaywriter Communications IBM
IBM PC Tym/comm MD/ISG ACS
Crosstalk* Microstuf
Softerm 2 Softronics
LinkIT ITSoftware
FileLynx/3278-PC Local Data
Smartcom II Hayes
Vterm Coefficient Sys>°
Vterm Techland Sys.
Tempus Link Micro Tempus
SmarTerm/PC TE100-FT Persoft, Inc.
SmarTerm 220 Persoft, Inc.
PC/Intercomm Mark of the Unicorn
Blast Communication Research
TANDY TRS80 Teleterm Telexpress
TI Professional Octacomm Houston Computer
WANG PC PC-VT100 emulation Wang

BLOCK MODE INTERFACE

Personal Computer Software Company
—————– ——– ——-
IBM PC Softerm Softronics
Impersonator Direct Aid
DO YOU WISH TO SEE THE CURRENT MENU AGAIN (Y/N):n
TYPE THE NUMBER OF THE DESIRED MENU ITEM FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:up
TYMNET INFORMATION SERVICE

Welcome to TYMNET’s Information Service! TYMNET is the world’s
largest Public Data Network, with local access in over 600 U.S. cities
and access to and from over 65 foreign countries. If you need more
help, please don’t hesitate to call one of our sales offices listed in
the directory for more personal and extensive help with your applica-
tion. To exit this service, please type the word ‘EXIT’.

1. HELP IN USING THE INFORMATION SERVICE
2. DIAL-UP ACCESS INFORMATION
3. PUBLIC DATA BASE AND TIMESHARING SERVICES AVAILABLE OVER TYMNET
4. INTERNATIONAL ACCESS INFORMATION
5. X.25 PRODUCTS CERTIFIED BY TYMNET
6. COMMUNICATIONS PRODUCTS VERIFIED BY TYMNET
7. HOST TYPES CURRENTLY INTERFACED ON TYMNET
8. TYMNET SALES OFFICE DIRECTORY
9. TYMNET TECHNICAL AND USER DOCUMENTATION

TYPE THE NUMBER OF THE DESIRED MENU ITEM FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:2
TYMNET DIAL-UP ACCESS INFORMATION

TYMNET is the world’s largest Public Data Network with dial-up
local access in over 500 cities nationwide. For a list of telephone
numbers for your state, or modem information, select the appropriate
entry from the menu.
To return to the main menu, type the word ‘UP’. To exit, type ‘EXIT’.

1. LIST OF STATES AND AREAS
2. LIST OF ACCESS NUMBERS FOR A SPECIFIC STATE OR AREA
3. LIST OF ALL ACCESS NUMBERS SORTED BY STATE / CITY
4. LIST OF ALL ACCESS NUMBERS SORTED BY NODE NUMBER
5. LIST OF ALL 2400 BPS ACCESS NUMBERS SORTED BY STATE / CITY
6. INFORMATION ON CHANGED NUMBERS AND NEW CITIES
7. INFORMATION ON MODEMS

TYPE THE NUMBER OF THE DESIRED MENU ITEM FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:1
TYMNET DIAL-UP ACCESS INDEX

ALABAMA ALASKA
ALBERTA ARIZONA
ARKANSAS BRITISH COLUMBIA
CALIFORNIA COLORADO
CONNECTICUT DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
DELAWARE FLORIDA
GEORGIA GUAM
HAWAII IDAHO
ILLINOIS INDIANA
IOWA KANSAS
KENTUCKY LOUISIANA
MAINE MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI MONTANA
NEBRASKA NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO OKLAHOMA
ONTARIO OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA PUERTO RICO
QUEBEC RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE TEXAS
UTAH VERMONT
VIRGINIA WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA WISCONSIN
WYOMING

DO YOU WISH TO SEE THE CURRENT MENU AGAIN (Y/N):n
TYPE THE NUMBER OF THE DESIRED MENU ITEM FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:2
ENTER THE NAME OF THE STATE FOR WHICH YOU DESIRE INFORMATION
TYPE THE DESIRED ENTRY OR “END” FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:utah

STATE / CITY DENSITY TELEPHONE # MODEM TYPE COMMENTS
———— ——- ———– ———- ——–
(IF NOT VADIC 3467 MODEM)
UTAH

OGDEN LOW 801/621-1280
PROVO LOW 801/375-0645
SALT LAKE HIGH 801/364-0780
SALT LAKE HIGH 801/533-8152 2400 BPS

TYPE THE DESIRED ENTRY OR “END” FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:end
DO YOU WISH TO SEE THE CURRENT MENU AGAIN (Y/N):n
TYPE THE NUMBER OF THE DESIRED MENU ITEM FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:up

TYMNET INFORMATION SERVICE

Welcome to TYMNET’s Information Service! TYMNET is the world’s
largest Public Data Network, with local access in over 600 U.S. cities
and access to and from over 65 foreign countries. If you need more
help, please don’t hesitate to call one of our sales offices listed in
the directory for more personal and extensive help with your applica-
tion. To exit this service, please type the word ‘EXIT’.

1. HELP IN USING THE INFORMATION SERVICE
2. DIAL-UP ACCESS INFORMATION
3. PUBLIC DATA BASE AND TIMESHARING SERVICES AVAILABLE OVER TYMNET
4. INTERNATIONAL ACCESS INFORMATION
5. X.25 PRODUCTS CERTIFIED BY TYMNET
6. COMMUNICATIONS PRODUCTS VERIFIED BY TYMNET
7. HOST TYPES CURRENTLY INTERFACED ON TYMNET
8. TYMNET SALES OFFICE DIRECTORY
9. TYMNET TECHNICAL AND USER DOCUMENTATION

TYPE THE NUMBER OF THE DESIRED MENU ITEM FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:9

TYMNET TECHNICAL AND USER DOCUMENTATION

Tymnet provides for our customer use technical and user documentation.
This directory lists the documentation available along with a brief
description. The documentation listed may be purchased from your Tymnet
Sales Representative. Please provide them with the publication name, number,
and price when ordering. To find the location of the Tymnet Sales Office
nearest you, check the Tymnet Sales Office Directory in the Information
System.

1. LIST OF TECHNICAL AND USER DOCUMENTATION AVAILABLE
2. DETAILED INFORMATION ON A SPECIFIC TECHNICAL OR USER DOCUMENT AVAILABLE
3. DETAILED INFORMATION ON ALL TECHNICAL OR USER DOCUMENTATION AVAILABLE

TYPE THE NUMBER OF THE DESIRED MENU ITEM FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:1
TYMNET TECHNICAL AND USER DOCUMENTATION

PUBLICATION NAME PUBLICATION NUMBER PRICE

TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION:

Telex Gateway Reference Manual NPD-046 $ 4.00
CMT/3270 Interface Reference Manual NPD-052 $ 6.50
Network Products Concepts and Facilities NPD-057 $20.00
Concepts and Facilities Update NPD-057-1 $ 2.00
TYMNET Engine Pocket Guide NPD-067 $ 7.50
Engine Diagnostics User’s Guide NPD-234 $20.00
Elf Operator’s Guide NPD-236 $ 5.50
X.PC Protocol Specifications NPD-269 $ 3.00
TYMNET X-25 NPD-271 $ 2.50
X.25/X.75 Capabilities NPD-272 $ 3.50
TYMNET Engine Maintenance Manual NPD-282 $30.00
Engine Site Preparation Guide NPD-356 $16.00
X.25/X.75 Interface Reference Manual NPD-399 $ 5.50
TOM Users Guide – Version 2.0 NPD-425 $ 2.75
The 2780/3780/HASP Interface Reference Manual NPD-431 $ 4.00
TMCS Users Guide – Version 5.6 NPD-508 $ 5.75
RAM Reference Manual Version 10.05 NPD-529 $ 4.50
RAM Reference Manual Updates NPD-529-1 $ 1.00
3270 Terminal Interface Reference Manual NPD-531 $ 3.00
Async Tymsat Reference Manual- Version 2 NPD-533 $ 3.00
PROBE Reference Manual NPD-534 $ 5.00
RAM Operator’s Guide NPD-535 $ 6.00
3270 Host Interface Reference Manual NPD-538 $ 3.00
NETVAL Users Guide – Version 1.14 NPD-592 $ 5.50
XOM Users Guide – Version 2 NPD-595 $10.00
Family Maintenance Print Manual NPD-604 $30.00
Family Maintenance Print Manual (Micro Engine) NPD-604-1 $15.50
Mac Diagnostic – Version 4.0 NPD-605 $ 4.50
Synchronous/Asynchronous Diagnostic NPD-606 $ 3.00
Enhanced Synchronous Diagnostic Version 2.0 NPD-607 $ 3.00
Engine Diagnostics Manual NPD-610 $15.00
Micro-Engine Maintenance Manual NPD-651 $18.50
Multiple Extended Processor System Description NPD-675 $ 2.00

USER DOCUMENTATION

Tymnet Network Specifications Users Manual NUD-100 $12.00
VT.100 NUD-101 $ 1.30
ADM-3A/Tymnet Model 430 NUD-102 $ 1.30
HP 2622A NUD-103 $ 1.30
ADM 11/Tymnet Model 431 NUD-104 $ 1.30
ADM 12 Plus/Tymnet Model 426 NUD-109 $ 1.30
IBM 3101 NUD-123 $ 1.30
Televideo 970 NUD-132 $ 1.30

DO YOU WISH TO SEE THE CURRENT MENU AGAIN (Y/N):n
TYPE THE NUMBER OF THE DESIRED MENU ITEM FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:2

TYPE THE DESIRED ENTRY OR “END” FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:ibm 3101

IBM 3101 NUD-123 $1.30

This guide provides brief but specific instructions for setting up an
asynchronous, ASCII, character mode terminal to mimic the functions of a
3270, EBCDIC, block mode terminal. The asynchronous terminal can then use
TYMNET Asynchronous-to-3270 software to access an IBM 370 or compatible host
computer through the TYMNET network.

TYPE THE DESIRED ENTRY OR “END” FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:end
DO YOU WISH TO SEE THE CURRENT MENU AGAIN (Y/N):n
TYPE THE NUMBER OF THE DESIRED MENU ITEM FOLLOWED BY A CARRIAGE RETURN:quit

Here ends part three of our brief glimpse into the world of Tymnet
Remember, You saw it first on the -:Twilight Phone:-



Fun with Temple’s Computers (A How To)

***THE FOLLOWING IS FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY***
***I ACCEPT NO RESPONSABILITY FOR ANYTHING YOU DO***
***WHICH GETS YOU ARRESTED OR SOMETHING***

&%&%&%&%&%&%&%& Fun with Temple’s Computers &%&%&%&%&%&%&%&%

Shut up what’s the number!?
~~~~ ~~ ~~~~ ~ ~~~ ~~~~~~~~
Gee your impatient…
2400 – (215)204-9630
9600 – (215)204-9638
14400 – (215)204-2800

So what the hell do I get?
~~ ~~~~ ~~~ ~~~~ ~~ ~ ~~~~
The following is a log of my activites…
Pardon my stuoidyt I’m not familiar with the system…
It is short but to me it looks like you could have a LOTTA fun !

CONNECT 14400/ARQ
C

Welcome to TempleNet – Temple University’s Ethernet network

Enter a Command followed by [Return] or [Enter].

Command: Description:
telnet astro Astro Unix system
tn3270 ibm IBM mainframe
telnet library Temple’s library catalog

For HELP, call the Network HOTLINE at 204-6529.

**Dialin for up to 2400 bps: 204-9630 thru 9634 (40 ports to WiseOwl)
**Dialin for up to 9600 bps: 204-9638 (7 ports to WiseOwl)
**Dialin for up to 14400 bps: 204-2800 (64 ports to TempleNet)

This system is restricted to authorized Temple University users and is
subject to audit. The unauthorized access, use, or modification of any
network component is a criminal violation of federal and state laws. (4)

TempleNet>telnet ibm
Trying IBM (155.247.14.2)… Open
.

.exit

HCPCFC015E Command not valid before LOGON: EXIT

Enter one of the following commands:

 LOGON userid (Example: LOGON VMUSER1)
 LOGOFF
.logon vmuser1

HCPLGA053E VMUSER1 not in CP directory

Enter one of the following commands:

 LOGON userid (Example: LOGON VMUSER1)
 LOGOFF
.logoff

LOGOFF AT 22:27:26 EDT FRIDAY 06/09/95

[Connection to IBM closed by foreign host]
TempleNet>

TempleNet>?

connect Connect to host – same as typing just a host name
disconnect Break the connection specified by name or number
exit, quit, logout Exit from the EXEC
lat Connect to service using DEC LAT protocol
lock Lock the terminal
name-connection Give a connection a logical name
resume Make the named connection be current
rlogin Connect to host using rlogin protocol
show Information commands, type “show ?” for list
slip Enter SLIP mode
systat Show terminal lines and users
telnet Connect to host using telnet protocol
tn3270 Connect to host using telnet protocol (3270)
terminal Change terminal’s parameters, type “terminal ?”
where Show open connections
xremote Enter XRemote mode
To resume connection

TempleNet>

TempleNet>telnet astro
Trying ASTRO (155.247.165.100)… Open

EP/IX (astro)

login: user1
Password:
UX:login: ERROR: Login incorrect

NO CARRIER

Now remember … 🙂
This system is restricted to authorized Temple University users and is
subject to audit. The unauthorized access, use, or modification of any
network component is a criminal violation of federal and state laws. (4)

Have fun with it!(Oh by the way I dialed the number by “accident” Hehehe)
-Splat 06/09/95

List of Terminal Identifiers

Terminal Identifiers

The following tables matches Terminal numerical IDs (telenet parmater 23)
Generic and Specific Terminal Identifiers.

ID # Generic Term ID Terminal Type (note)
—- ——- ——- —————————

0 Unknown or Synch. Host
1 B1 AJ63 Anderson Jacobson 630
2 B5 AJ86 Anderson Jacobson 860 (9)
3 A2 CD30 CDI 1030
4 D1 DP22 Datapoint 2200
5 D2 DP30 Datapoint 3000 & 3300
6 D3 HP21 Hewlett-Packard 2100s (9)
7 A2 CT30 CT Execuport 300
9 A4 GE30 GE Terminet 300
10 A3 GE12 GE Terminet 1200
11 D1 HZ20 Hazeltine 2000
12 E1 IBM1 2741 EBCD (5)
13 E2 IBM2 2741 EBCD (6)
14 E3 IBM3 2741 EBCD (7)
15 E4 IBM4 2741 EBCD (8)
16 C1 IBM5 2741 Correspondence (1)
17 C2 IBM6 2741 Correspondence (2)
18 C3 IBM7 2741 Correspondence (3)
19 C4 IBM8 2741 Correspondence (4)
20 D1 T4/2 Special Terminal
26 A1 TT33 Teletype 33
27 A1 TT35 Teletype 35
30 D1 TT40 Teletype 40
32 A7 TI25 TI 725
33 A2 TI33 TI 733 (Default)
34 A6 TI45 TI 735
35 B2 UV50 Univac DCT 500
38 D1 IFVD Infoton Vistar Display
39 D1 RI34 Teleray 3300-3700
40 A5 TN30 GE Terminet 30
41 A8 DECW DEC LA35/36 Decwriter II
43 A3 TN12 GE Terminet 120
44 A9 CT12 CT Execuport 1200
45 A1 Generic Terminal
46 A2 Generic Terminal
47 A3 Generic Terminal
48 A4 Generic Terminal
49 A5 Generic Terminal
50 A6 Generic Terminal
51 A7 Generic Terminal
52 A8 Generic Terminal
53 A9 Generic Terminal
54 D1 ADDS ADDS 520, 580, 980
55 B3 AJ83 AJ 830 & 832
56 B1 Generic Terminal
57 B2 Generic Terminal
59 D1 BHMB Beehive MiniBee 2
60 C1 Generic Terminal
61 C2 Generic Terminal
62 C3 Generic Terminal
63 C4 Generic Terminal
64 D1 CD11 CDI 1132
65 A2 CD12 CDI 1202 & 1203
66 D1 Generic Terminal
67 D2 Generic Terminal
68 D1 DECV DEC VT50 & VT52
69 D1 DGLG Digi-Log 33, Telecomputer I
70 A1 DPPT Data Products Portaterm
71 B3 DS16 Diablo 1550 & 1620
72 E1 Generic Terminal
73 E2 Generic Terminal
74 E3 Generic Terminal
75 E4 Generic Terminal
76 B3 GS30 Gen-Comm Systems 300
77 D1 HP26 HP 2640, 2644, 2645
78 D1 LSAM Lear Siegler ADM1, 2, 3
79 A2 NC60 NCR 260
80 B1 TD40 Trendata 4000
81 D1 TI45 TI 745
82 D2 TI65 TI 763, 765 (10)
83 D1 TK40 Tektronix 4002-4023
84 B3 TT43 Teletype 43
85 A3 WU30 Western Union EDT 30
86 A4 WU12 Western Union EDT 1200
87 B3 DT30 Data Term & Comm DCT 300-30 2
88 B3 Generic Terminal
89 B4 Generic Terminal
90 B5 Generic Terminal (9)
91 D3 Generic Terminal (9)
127 Asynchronous Hosts

The following are terminal models with corresponding generic terminal
types supported by the terminal handler.

Terminal Model ID (note)
————————————- ———

ADDS Consul 520, 580, 980 D1 (1)
ADDS Envoy 620, Regent D1 (1)
Alanthus Data Terminal T-133 A1
T-300 A8
T-1200 A3
Alanthus Miniterm A2
AM-Jacquard Amtext 425 D1 (1)
Anderson Jacobsen 510 D1 (1)
Anderson Jacobsen 630 B1
Anderson Jacobsen 830 & 832 B3 (2)
Anderson Jacobsen 860 B5
Apple II D1 (1)
Atari 400, 800 D1 (1)
AT&T Dataspeed 40/1, 40/2, 40/3 D1 (1)
Beehive MiniBee, MicroBee D1 (1)
Centronics 761 A8
Commodore Pet D1 (1)
Compu-Color II D1 (1)
Computer Devices CDI 1030 A2
Computer Devices Teleterm 1132 A8
Computer Devices Miniterm 1200 series A2
Computer Transceiver Execuport 300 A2
Computer Transceiver Execuport 1200 A2
Computer Transceiver Execuport 4000 A2
CPT 6000, 8000 D1 (1)
Datamedia Elite D1 (1)
Datapoint 1500, 1800, 2200, 3000, 3300,
3600, 3800 D1 (1)
Data Products Portaterm A1
Data Terminal & Comm DTC 300, 302 B3 (2)
Diablo Hyterm B3 (2)
Digi-log 33 & Telecomputer II D1 (1)
DEC (LA 35-36) Decwriter II A8
DEC (LA 120) Decwriter III A8
DEC VT50, VT52, VT100, WS78, WS200 D1 (1)
Gen-Comm Systems 300 B3 (2)
GE Terminet 30 A5
GE Terminet 120, 1200 A3
GE Terminet 300 A4
General Terminal GT-100A, GT-101, GT-110,
GT-400, GT-400B D1 (1)
Hazeltine 1500, 1400, 2000 D1 (1)
Hewlett Packard 2621 D3
Hewlett Packard 2640 series D1 (1)
IBM PC (and compatibles) D1 (1)
IBM 3101 D1 (1)
Informer I304, D304 D1 (1)
Infoton 100, 200, 400, Vistar D1 (1)
Intelligent Systems Intecolor D1 (1)
Intertex Intertube II D1 (1)
Lanier Word Processor D1 (1)
Lear Siegler ADM series D1 (1)
Lexitron 1202, 1303 D1 (1)
Memorex 1240 A2
Micom 2000, 2001 D1 (1)
NBI 3000 D1 (1)
NCR 260 A2
Perkin-Elmer Model 110, Owl, Bantam D1 (1)
Perkin-Elmer Carousel 300 Series A8
Radio Shack TRS 80 D1 (1)
Research Inc. Teleray D1 (1)
Tektronix 4002-4023 D1 (1)
Teletype Model 33, 35 A1
Teletype Model 40 D1 (1)
Teletype Model 43 B3 (2)
Teletype Model 40/1, 40/2, 40/3 D1 (1)
Texas Instrument 725 A7
733 A2
735 A6
743, 745, 763, 765 D1 (1)
820 B3 (2)
99/4 D1 (1)
Trendata 4000 (ASCII) B1
Tymshare 110, 212 A2
315 A8
325 B3 (2)
Univac DCT 500 B4
WANG 20, 25, 30, 105, 130, 145 D1 (1)
Western Union EDT 30, 35 A1
300 A4
1200 A4
XEROX 800, 850, 860 D1 (1)
XEROX 1700 B3 (2)

Notes: (1) Use D3 if you wish Telenet to respond to XON/XOFF
flow control.
(2) Use B5 if you wish Telenet to respond to XON/XOFF
flow control.

The following are the major characteristics of the generic terminal
types supported by the terminal handler:

Generic Tab LF CR Pad CR Pad Line Code
Pad Pad Fixed Var’bl Size Type (note)
——- — — —— —— —- ———————–

A1 0 1 0 0 72 ASCII
A2 0 2 7 0 80 ASCII
A3 0 0 0 0 120 ASCII – Printer
A4 0 6 0 0 120 ASCII
A5 0 5 5 0 120 ASCII
A6 0 0 1 1 80 ASCII
A7 0 4 0 2 80 ASCII
A8 2 0 1 0 132 ASCII
A9 12 10 16 6 132 ASCII

B1 1 0 2 1 132 ASCII–BUFFERED
B2 0 2 6 0 132 ASCII–BUFFERED
B3 0 0 0 0 132 ASCII–BUFFERED
B4 0 2 10 0 132 ASCII–BUFFERED
B5 0 0 0 0 132 ASCII–BUFFERED (9)

C1 1 1 4 1 130 2741 Correspondence (1)
C2 1 1 4 1 130 2741 Correspondence (2)
C3 1 1 4 1 130 2741 Correspondence (3)
C4 1 1 4 1 130 2741 Correspondence (4)

D1 0 0 0 0 80 ASCII–CRT
D2 0 0 0 0 72 ASCII–CRT
D3 0 0 0 0 80 ASCII–CRT (9)

E1 1 1 4 1 130 2741 EBCD (5)
E2 1 1 4 1 130 2741 EBCD (6)
E3 1 1 4 1 130 2741 EBCD (7)
E4 1 1 4 1 130 2741 EBCD (8)

Notes:

(1) Corresponds with Ball Types: 001, 005, 007, 008, 012, 020, 030,
050, 053, 067, 070, and 085. Ball Type code can be found
underneath the locking tab of the ball on an IBM 2741 terminal.

(2) Corresponds with Ball Types: 006, 010, 015, 019, 059, and 090.

(3) Corresponds with Ball Types: 021, 025, 026, 027, 028, 029, 031,
032, 033, 034, 035, 036, 037, 038, 029, 060, 068, 086, 123, 129,
130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 146, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142,
143, 144, 145, 156, and 161.

(4) Corresponds with Ball Types: 043 and 054.

(5) Corresponds with Ball Types: 963, 996, and 998.

(6) Corresponds with Ball Types: 938, 939, 961, 962, and 997.

(7) Corresponds with Ball Types: 942 and 943.

(8) Corresponds with Ball Types: 947 and 948.

(9) Terminal Types D3 and B5 enable Terminal-to-PAD flow control in
the Terminal PAD (TFLOW).

(10) The specific Terminal ID, TI65, incorrect maps to the generic
ID, D2. Since TI 763 and 765 print 80 character per line, users
with these terminals should specify a generic TERM ID of either
D3 (TFLOW enabled) or D1 (TFLOW not specified).



A Guide to ADS System, by Lord Digital and the Phantom

:+::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::+:
[:] [:]
[:] A Guide To: [:]
[:] [:]
[:] A.D.S. Systems. [:]
[:] =============== [:]
[:] [:]
[:] [Part /:basics] [:]
[:] [:]
[:] By: [:]
[:] [:]
[:] …/\^ lord digital ^/\… [:]
[:] [:]
[:] and [:]
[:] [:]
[:] —The [:]
[:] Phantom— [:]
[:] [:]
:+::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::+:
—————————————-
[ Formatted for 80 column viewing… ]
—————————————-

For the most part A.D.S. (Audio Distribution Systems) are owned and
maintained by IBM. The systems themselves are usually “Fringe Benefits” to
company employees who (as is usually the case) have never bothered to use the
Ads capabilities, as using it requires some basic intelligence and the skill to
push buttons in a pre-arranged order. [Abilities most IBM employees are sadly
lacking in…] As a result password hacking is a joke.

[-] -A.D.S. Syntax:- [-]

When Asked to “key-press” entries on Ads, you push the keys on your phone
that correspond to the letters you want. ie: To listen to a message Ads will
prompt that you “push star l” meaning you push the asterisk “*”, followed by
the “5” key which corresponds to the letters “J,K,L”.

[-] Standard Default [-]
Menu:

If the company using the Ads is one other than IBM The standard defaults may
have been changed. The changes are really not pertinant to system operation as
it shouldn’t take more then a minute or two of hitting key’s to discover what
the defaults have been changed to.

Typical defaults:
[#] – Help key, depressing it will give you detailed (sometimes not so
detailed) help on a function. It depends largely on which “sub-menu” you are
currently on.

[NOTE:] For those of you on Mci, don’t panic, you need to push it only for a
fraction of a second for it to register. This is not enough time delay to have
Mci recognize The pound sign “#” as a valid “disconnect command.”

[*] – Abort key, depressing the asterisk will abort the function currently
taking place, with an audible “OK” when recognized. It also returns you to the
main menu level.

[4-9] – At the main menu the keys 4-9 when not used in conjunction with
another command (such as the “* G”, “* L”, “* R” commands) will usually respond
with “Invalid key”.

[3] – At the main menu “3” is the disconnect key. When pushed Ads will
respond with “Do you want to hang up? Push 1-yes, or 2-no”.

[2] – Customize key. At the main menu pushing the “2” key allows you to
customize your accnt. for new defaults such as: Slow/Med/Fast msg. playback,
Your “status” (home, at office, on vacation, etc) your secretary’s (assuming
you have one) status, your family’s status, and your, your family’s,
secretary’s and guests passwords. Normal default for guest PW is: IBM (How
innovative). For obvious reasons it is strongly recommended that you change
your PW once you “acquire” your accnt. [More on this in a later section…]

[1] – Is usually set for “Old msg. playback” ie: msg.’s that you have
allready received but want to retain as “Old messages” (The default time period
for holding a old msg. is 1 week, this period can be extended to as much as 2
months on some systems. (You customize it to whatever you want) Keep in mind
that different systems allocate different amounts of storage to each user.

Typical commands:
—————-

* L – Listen to your messages
* R – Record a message
* G – Get another message
* S – Send a message

After some commands you will be prompted with a sub-menu ie:

*R Push 1-record new message 2-insert at: 3-add to message
*S push 1-send to single user 2-send to multiple users.

etc…

[-] Password Hacking [-]

When you first call the Ads you will be greeted with the systems “hello”.
Usually something like: “Welcome to [whatever branch] IBM ADS. Please key-
pres subscribers last name first, until recognized:” At this point it might be
helpful to open a telephone book and just go from a-z using the more average
names. I have yet to find a ADS without at least several “Smith’s” being in
the “userlog”. Assuming the system recognized the last name as a valid one it
will now do one of two things depending on whether there is more then one
person on the system with the same last name. If for example there are 3
“Smith’s” on the system it will then ask: “select 1- John Smith, select 2-
Mark Smith, select 3- George Smith” If there is only one person on the system
with that particular last name Ads will prompt: “Please key-press your
password”. If there were multiple persons on the system with the same last
name, after you have selected who you want it will give you the same: “Please
key-press your password” prompt as in the previous example.

Default passwords:
—————–
If the person to whom the password was assigned to is either:

[1] Not using the accnt.
[2] Dense (a very large proportion fit into this category)

then the pw will be set (in the case of 1) to the systems defaults, usually a
3-6 digit pw that repeats the same # several times. ie: Assuming the system
defaults to 6 character pw’s the pw could be:

000000
111111
222222
etc.
999999

Or in the case of 2, it will very likely be the persons first/or last name
(Great idea eh…?, that way they’ll never forget it (if they’re lucky) there
is also the added advantage that if this persons PW suddenly vanishes they are
not very likely to report it missing, very often they will just assume that it
doesn’t work because of their own stupidity, after all the computer is never
wrong) So for example if the persons name was: Martha Technophobe, and the
maximum length of pw’s allowed was 6 chars. the pw could be:

MARTHA
or
TECHNO

A large number of computer “semi-literate” people, will do it in this way.

[ Guidelines. ]
—————-

[1] When you enter an accnt. change NOTHING at the beginning, if you
discover that you have captured a secretary accnt. Leave everything alone and
leave. Secretary’s have no privilege, and their superior’s tend to become
suspicious when they can no longer reach them. Also your (the secretary’s)
superior can change the password at will from his (or her) accnt.

[2] When you have found an accnt that suits you, go immediately to [2]-
customize and change the PW. Also be sure to leave your “Status” as well as
your “Familiy’s, and Secretary’s” at the system default of: “Not Defined”

[3] When people leave you messages, be sure they contain no information that
could be in any way “damaging” to you. Because if your accnt. is discovered
and subsequently closed down the operators of the system will have any msg.’s
that were meant for you.

[4] When sending a message to someone else who has also captured an accnt.
on the system, be sure to send it to the right accnt. #, so some fool in
marketing doesn’t recieve “Here’s the latest codes to that system you wanted”
when you punched in his accnt. by accident.

[5] Be aware that be people who have not hacked their own accounts on the Ads
you are currently on can still leave you messages on a “Guest PW”. When they
want to do so they simply type in your last name (the accnt.’s last name) when
they connect to the Ads then when prompted for: “Please key-press your PW”
they just use the “Guest PW” which is at default usually IBM, but you of course
can change it to whatever you want. ie: your Guest PW could be re-defined to
be: “Phreak” not a particularly advisable one, but valid.

[6] Try to find your own Ads system through scanning of phone #’s several
digits from that of a IBM (or other) Co5478
Shadow Land…………(303) 939-9614
Later…
-/->The Warelock<-\- Call The Works BBS - 1600+ Textfiles! - [914]/238-8195 - 300/1200 - Always Open 

Screwing with School Computers, by Liquid Bug

*** Screwing with School Computers ***

Hacking is all about information. To become a hacker you must learn everything you know
on your own or by listening to other hackers. Schools and what they call “education” has little
to do with learning. So this file is here to show you some truly productive things to do at
school:

Most middle and high schools use Macintosh computers for 2 reasons. They’re easier to use
and harder to fuck up. Almost all school computers use some sort of security program. Here I
will discuss how to get around two popular security programs: FoolProof and At Ease. You can
probably use these methods on other programs as well.

– FoolProof: FoolProof is a program that locks up parts of the computer. It is run thru the
extention FoolProof INIT whenever the computer is started up. The first thing to try is to
hold SHIFT during startup to turn the extentions off. Sometimes this works. Sometimes it
doesn’t. If this does work, try to copy FoolProof onto a disk to use as an unlock disk if you
ever come to a computer where the extentions off method doesn’t work. If shift doesn’t work
there is a few other things you can do. If you just want to get into a locked folder just do a
FIND and search for a file you know is inside. Example: You want to get into the System folder.
Go to FIND and search for FINDER, a file you know is inside System Folder. It will bring you to
the Finder, inside the System Folder. From there you can use anything else inside. Sometimes
every single file inside the System Folder will also be locked and then this doesn’t work. If all
else fails you need to get an unlock disk. Here is how to make and use one:

1) Go to an old computer such as a Mac Classic and hold shift during start-up.
2) FoolProof should be turned off along with the extentions.
3) Copy FoolProof onto a disk
4) Take the disk to a locked computer
5) Run FoolProof off the disk
6) It’ll display some message asking you if you want to shut down to other version of
FoolProof running. Click YES.

If you can’t get to a computer where the extentions off method works tell a nice teacher that you
need to move some files and you need FoolProof to be off. He should turn it off and when he
isn’t looking you can copy FoolProof to a disk.

– At Ease: At ease is a different Operating System than the Mac OS and it won’t let you out
unless you have the password. If you have a nack for guessing passwords try that. Do this: hold
COMMAND and hit the POWER key. You should get a box with a little > prompt. Type G FINDER to
get back to the finder. If this doesn’t work run as many applications as you can to clog up
memory. You should soon get a message saying “Not enough memory to run this application, would
you like to close At Ease?” Click yes (no, really?).

Things to do to a computer once its unlocked:
– Change the colors: Go into Control Panel and change the colors of everything. It should
annoy sysadmins a bit.

– Change the font: Change the main font to Zaft Dingbats or Symbol so no one can read the
titles to things.

– Change icons: Change the names and pictures of a bunch of icons

– Put messages in StartUp items: Type a message and put it into the Startup Items menu.

– Shut down on StartUp: Go to Apple Menu Items and get the Shut Down item. Put it into the
StartUp itmes folder. Gee, I wonder what that would do?

– Relock: If you can get a version of FoolProof with no password assigned put it into use
with a different password so teachers will be locked out of their comptuers.

There are bajillions of other cool tricks you could do, so just play around. Remember:
Anyone can delete a file. There’s no challenge in that, its just vandalism. It is much better
to make a kewl alteration to something then to delete it.

Fun stuff to do to Netscape:

– Change the home page location to either, your own page or a really nasty site.

– Change the font to Zaft Dingbats or Symbol

– Select “Always use my colors” on the Color prefs and change the backgroud, foreground and
links to white. It’ll be more than slightly anoying.

Prank E-Mailing:

Change the Identity settings to someone else and send nasty E-Mail messages to all your favorite
teachers. Or if you really hate a teacher you can SPAM them like this:

1) First send as many messages as you can to the target with large attachments.
2) Go on the internet and sign the target up for a million mailing lists. A great place with
tons of mailing lists to sign her/him up for can me found at the “List of Entemology Resources
on the Web — complete”. Just type “insects” at infoseek.
3) Go into a weird newsgroup and type a bunch of messages asking people to mail you back as
the targets adress.

The Administration Shared Disk:

This is the server disk in which all the information about Grades, Discipline and a bunch of
other crap is stored. Sometimes you can find a link to it on a student computer by seraching for
theses words “admin”,”shared disk”, and the name of your school district. If you get to it you
will probably need a User Name and password. Type the name of one of the Sysadmins at the school
in a bunch of formats like “last, first intial”, “last, first”, “first last” and so on. Then
try to guess a password. Use things like the persons kids names, wife’s names and words like
“secret”, “password”, “school”, “education” or other info. And easier way to get onto the
shared disk is to get on it directly from a sysadmin computer. Here is a way to get acess to one:

1) While your class is doing a report get some info on it onto a Mac formatted disk.
2) Right after school gets out, find a nice teacher that looks busy.
3) Tell him/her that you have info on a Mac disk and you need to get it put onto an IBM disk
so you can take it home to work on (tell him you have and IBM at home).
4) Ask him how you would do that (even though you probably know) just to act stupid.
5) He should tell you how and let you use the computer.
6) Start to copy the files and reformatt like you are supposed to be doing really slow until
he turns his back.
7) FIND the sysadmin shared disk and copy as much info as you can into a folder marked personal
on the disk.
8) Finish the copying and formatting.

The reason you named it personal is in case he wants to look in the folder you can just
tell him its private. Now you can read all the info and alter it to your liking. This may
containt info on passwords and other important stuff. After you edit it on the disk do the same
trick again either the next day (pretend you need to change them back to Mac files) or some
other day to a different teacher and replace the info currently on there with the new stuff.
If the reformat trick doesn’t work here are some others:

– One day when you get in trouble and are in the principal or vice-principals office, if he
leaves the room for a while, really quickly copy the files. This is why you should ALWAYS carry
a disk in you pocket. It will come in handy.

– Simply sneak into a clasroom while the teacher’s at lunch

Fun stuff you can get off the net. Go to El Grande’s Mac Hack page (just look up
“El Grande’s Mac Hacks” on infoseek). There are a bunch of cool Mac tricks that are very good
for usage on school computers.

Hacking from home: I’m not quite sure if it would be any use, but here is a way to get
the phone number of any school computer:

If your phone company has a number you can dial to find out where you are at (like 811) then
just do this: Go into a terminal (such as Microsoft Works Communications), dial 811 and listen
really closesly to the computer. You should be able to make out a number.

If your phone company has no such service then try this:

Right before you come home from school do this:

1) Go into a terminal (such as Microsoft Works Communications)
2) Dial your home phone number and let someone pickup and say “Hello” about 5 times or if no
one’s home just let it ring for a while.
3) Go directly home, imediately.
4) Run to the phone and dial *69
5) If no one has called after you did, it should tell you the number of the computer you
dialed from.

Thats about it. This whole time I have been under the assumption that your school uses
Macs. If it doesn’t there are many more tricks you can do on a PC as long as you know your
way around DOS. If you are fluent with DOS you have infinite power on a PC.

_____________________________
| _________________________ |
|| /\ /\ ||
|| \ ___ / ||
|| <.> <.> Liquid Bug ||
|| \ / ||
||_________________________||
|___________________________|

Understanding NetBIOS by NeonSurge of Rhino9

Understanding NetBIOS
By NeonSurge
Released through the rhino9 Team

Preface

Before you begin reading this paper, understand that this paper was written for the novice to the concept of NetBIOS, but – it also contains information the veteran might find educational. I am prefacing this so that I do not get e-mail like “Why did you start your paper off so basic?” – Simple, its written for people that may be coming from an enviroment that does not use NetBIOS, so they would need me to start with basics, thanks. -NeonSurge, rhino9 team.

Whats is NetBIOS?

NetBIOS (Network Basic Input/Output System) was originally developed by IBM and Sytek as an Application Programming Interface (API) for client software to access LAN resources. Since its creation, NetBIOS has become the basis for many other networking applications. In its strictest sense, NetBIOS is an interface specification for acessing networking services.

NetBIOS, a layer of software developed to link a network operating system with specific hardware, was originally designed as THE network controller for IBM’s Network LAN. NetBIOS has now been extended to allow programs written using the NetBIOS interface to operate on the IBM token ring architecture. NetBIOS has since been adopted as an industry standard and now, it is common to refer to NetBIOS-compatible LANs.

It offers network applications a set of “hooks” to carry out inter-application communication and data transfer. In a basic sense, NetBIOS allows applications to talk to the network. Its intention is to isolate application programs from any type of hardware dependancies. It also spares software developers the task of developing network error recovery and low level message addressing or routing. The use of the NetBIOS interface does alot of this work for them.

NetBIOS standardizes the interface between applications and a LANs operating capabilities. With this, it can be specified to which levels of the OSI model the application can write to, making the application transportable to other networks. In a NetBIOS LAN enviroment, computers are known on the system by a name. Each computer on the network has a permanent name that is programmed in various different ways. These names will be discussed in more detail below.

PC’s on a NetBIOS LAN communicate either by establishing a session or by using NetBIOS datagram or broadcast methods. Sessions allow for a larger message to be sent and handle error detection and correction. The communication is on a one-to-one basis. Datagram and broadcast methods allow one computer to communicate with several other computers at the same time, but are limited in message size. There is no error detection or correction using these datagram or broadcast methods. However, datagram communication allows for communication without having to establish a session.

All communication in these enviroments are presented to NetBIOS in a format called Network Control Blocks (NCB). The allocation of these blocks in memory is dependant on the user program. These NCB’s are divided into fields, these are reserved for input and output respectively.

NetBIOS is a very common protocol used in todays enviroments. NetBIOS is supported on Ethernet, TokenRing, and IBM PC Networks. In its original induction, it was defined as only an interface between the application and the network adapter. Since then, transport like functions have been added to NetBIOS, making it more functional over time.

In NetBIOS, connection (TCP) oriented and connectionless (UDP) communication are both supported. It supports both broadcasts and multicasting and supports three distinct services: Naming, Session, and Datagram.

NetBIOS Names

NetBIOS names are used to identify resources on a network. Applications use these names to start and end sessions. You can configure a single machine with multiple applications, each of which has a unique NetBIOS name. Each PC that supports an application also has a NetBIOS station name that is user defined or that NetBIOS derives by internal means.

NetBIOS can consist of up to 16 aplhanumeric characters. The combination of characters must be unique within the entire source routing network. Before a PC that uses NetBIOS can fully function on a network, that PC must register their NetBIOS name.

When a client becomes active, the client advertises their name. A client is considered to be registered when it can successfully advertise itself without any other client claiming it has the same name. The steps of the registration process is as follows:

1. Uppon boot up, the client broadcasts itself and its NetBIOS information anywhere from 6 to 10 to ensure every other client on the network receives the information.

2. If another client on the network already has the name, that NetBIOS client issues its own broadcast to indicate that the name is in use. The client who is trying to register the already in use name, stop all attempts to register that name.

3. If no other client on the network objects to the name registration, the client will finish the registration process.

There are two types of names in a NetBIOS enviroment: Unique and Group. A unique name must be unique across the network. A group name does not have to be unique and all processes that have a given group name belong to the group. Each NetBIOS node maintains a table of all names currently owned by that node.

The NetBIOS naming convention allows for 16 characters in a NetBIOS name. Microsoft, however, limits these names to 15 characters and uses the 16th character as a NetBIOS suffix. A NetBIOS suffix is used by Microsoft Networking software to indentify the functionality installed or the registered device or service.

[QuickNote: SMB and NBT (NetBIOS over TCP/IP work very closely together and both use ports 137, 138, 139. Port 137 is NetBIOS name UDP. Port 138 is NetBIOS datagram UDP. Port 139 is NetBIOS session TCP. For further information on NetBIOS, read the paper at the rhino9 website listed above]

The following is a table of NetBIOS suffixes currently used by Microsoft WindowsNT. These suffixes are displayed in hexadecimal format.

Name Number Type Usage
==========================================================================
00 U Workstation Service
01 U Messenger Service
<\\_MSBROWSE_> 01 G Master Browser
03 U Messenger Service
06 U RAS Server Service
1F U NetDDE Service
20 U File Server Service
21 U RAS Client Service
22 U Exchange Interchange
23 U Exchange Store
24 U Exchange Directory
30 U Modem Sharing Server Service
31 U Modem Sharing Client Service
43 U SMS Client Remote Control
44 U SMS Admin Remote Control Tool
45 U SMS Client Remote Chat
46 U SMS Client Remote Transfer
4C U DEC Pathworks TCPIP Service
52 U DEC Pathworks TCPIP Service
87 U Exchange MTA
6A U Exchange IMC
BE U Network Monitor Agent
BF U Network Monitor Apps
03 U Messenger Service
00 G Domain Name
1B U Domain Master Browser
1C G Domain Controllers
1D U Master Browser
1E G Browser Service Elections
1C G Internet Information Server
00 U Internet Information Server
[2B] U Lotus Notes Server
IRISMULTICAST [2F] G Lotus Notes
IRISNAMESERVER [33] G Lotus Notes
Forte_$ND800ZA [20] U DCA Irmalan Gateway Service

Unique (U): The name may have only one IP address assigned to it. On a network device, multiple occurences of a single name may appear to be registered, but the suffix will be unique, making the entire name unique.

Group (G): A normal group; the single name may exist with many IP addresses.

Multihomed (M): The name is unique, but due to multiple network interfaces on the same computer, this configuration is necessary to permit the registration. Maximum number of addresses is 25.

Internet Group (I): This is a special configuration of the group name used to manage WinNT domain names.

Domain Name (D): New in NT 4.0

For a quick and dirty look at a servers registered NetBIOS names and services, issue the following NBTSTAT command:

nbtstat -A [ipaddress]

NetBIOS Sessions

The NetBIOS session service provides a connection-oriented, reliable, full-duplex message service to a user process. NetBIOS requires one process to be the client and the other to be the server. NetBIOS session establishment requires a preordained cooperation between the two stations. One application must have issued a Listen command when another application issues a Call command. The Listen command references a name in its NetBIOS name table (or WINS server), and also the remote name an application must use to qualify as a session partner. If the receiver (listener) is not already listening, the Call will be unsuccessful. If the call is successful, each application receives notification of session establishment with the session-id. The Send and Receive commands the transfer data. At the end of a session, either application can issue a Hang-Up command. There is no real flow control for the session service because it is assumed a LAN is fast enough to carry the required traffic.

NetBIOS Datagrams

Datagrams can be sent to a specific name, sent to all members of a group, or broadcast to the entire LAN. As with other datagram services, the NetBIOS datagrams are connectionless and unreliable. The Send_Datagram command requires the caller to specify the name of the destination. If the destination is a group name, then every member of the group receives the datagram. The caller of the Receive_Datagram command must specify the local name for which it wants to receive datagrams. The Receive_Datagram command also returns the name of the sender, in addition to the actual datagram data. If NetBIOS receives a datagram, but there are no Receive_Datagram commands pending, then the datagram is discarded.

The Send_Broadcast_Datagram command sends the message to every NetBIOS system on the local network. When a broadcast datagram is received by a NetBIOS node, every process that has issued a Receive_Broadcast_Datagram command receives the datagram. If none of these commands are outstanding when the broadcast datagram is received, the datagram is discarded.

NetBIOS enables an application to establish a session with another device and lets the network redirector and transaction protocols pass a request to and from another machine. NetBIOS does not actually manipulate the data. The NetBIOS specification defines an interface to the network protocol used to reach those services, not the protocol itself. Historically, has been paired with a network protocol called NetBEUI (network extended user interface). The association of the interface and the protocol has sometimes caused confusion, but the two are different.

Network protocols always provide at least one method for locating and connecting to a particular service on a network. This is usually accomplished by converting a node or service name to a network address (name resolution). NetBIOS service names must be resolved to an IP address before connections can be established with TCP/IP. Most NetBIOS implementations for TCP/IP accomplish name address resolution by using either broadcast or LMHOSTS files. In a Microsoft enviroment, you would probably also use a NetBIOS Namer Server known as WINS.

NetBEUI Explained

NetBEUI is an enhanced version of the NetBIOS protocol used by network operating systems. It formalizes the transport frame that was never standardized in NetBIOS and adds additional functions. The transport layer driver frequently used by Microsofts LAN Manager. NetBEUI implements the OSI LLC2 protocol. NetBEUI is the original PC networking protocol and interface designed by IBM for the LanManger Server. This protocol was later adopted by Microsoft for their networking products. It specifies the way that higher level software sends and receives messages over the NetBIOS frame protocol. This protocol runs over the standard 802.2 data-link protocol layer.

NetBIOS Scopes

A NetBIOS Scope ID provides an extended naming service for the NetBIOS over TCP/IP (Known as NBT) module. The primary purpose of a NetBIOS scope ID is to isolate NetBIOS traffic on a single network to only those nodes with the same NetBIOS scope ID. The NetBIOS scope ID is a character string that is appended to the NetBIOS name. The NetBIOS scope ID on two hosts must match, or the two hosts will not be able to communicate. The NetBIOS Scope ID also allows computers to use the same computer namee as they have different scope IDs. The Scope ID becomes a part of the NetBIOS name, making the name unique.

Thats it for NetBIOS. If you have any comments or questions… direct them to NeonSurge@abyss.com.

Rhino9: The WindowsNT Security Research Team:
www.x-treme.abyss.com/techvoodoo/rhino9

Peace.
NeonSurge
NeonSurge@abyss.com